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June 7, 2010

Spelling Corrections in Google Suggest

Google Suggest has already been detecting misspellings and showing suggestions that include the properly spelled keywords, but now the mistakes are easier to spot. If you type a misspelled query, Google Suggest includes the "did you mean" label.

"These spelling suggestions already exist on the results page, but by moving them to an earlier point in the search process, we hope we've made it faster and easier to get to the results you're looking for. Right now, this feature is offered only for google.com in English, but we're working to roll this out internationally in the near future," explains Google.


A Wall Street Journal article listed some of the most commonly misspelled words in Google and other search engines: "Criagslist" instead of "Craigslist", "Facebok" instead of "Facebook", "definately", "definetly" or "definatly" instead of "definitely", "stilletos" or "stillettos" instead of "stilettos", "mischevious" and "mischievious" instead of "mischievous". Yahoo's most misspelled word of 2010 so far was Eyjafjallajokull, the famous volcano in Iceland that erupted this year.

5 comments:

  1. imagine little language flags on top of the input windows, by which you could find the same word in other languages, synonyms, related terms

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  2. It's simple, but very cool, thanks!

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  3. I sure the owners of misspelled domain names (such as facebok!) are not going to be as impressed by Google's advances! ;-)

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  4. Try searcvhing for webcontrol (the ASP.net concept), and Google search 'suggestions' replaces it with Web Control. Without permission. Thanks a lot, Google - brilliantly unhelpful backseat driving, as per usual. Idiots.

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  5. All very useful. Until you begin to 'correct' technical spelling terms like "silverlight" to "silver light" and - by default - return the search results for your incorrectly-presumed term instead of the one the user wanted to search for. And don't even get me started on annoying 'corrections' of non-US spelling. The sooner Google realises that they really *don't* know what I mean better than I do, the better. Until then, I'm getting the Bing out of here.

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