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May 11, 2011

Chromebooks

Fast, simple, secure, built for the Web, doesn't require administration. It's a Chromebook, a Chrome OS notebook that will be available starting from next month.

"Chromebooks will be available online June 15 in the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, Netherlands, Italy and Spain. More countries will follow in the coming months. In the U.S., Chromebooks will be available from Amazon and Best Buy and internationally from leading retailers," informs Google.

Google's simplified computing model puts the browser at the core and creates an operating system that revolves around Google Chrome. Samsung and Acer are the launch partners. Samsung's notebooks have 12.1" displays, Atom Dual-Core processors, 16 GB solid state drives, weigh 1.48 kg and get 8.5 hours of continuous usage. They're similar to the Acer notebooks, which have 11.6" displays, a higher resolution, but only get 6 hours of usage. Some of the notebooks include 3G support, while other notebooks are Wi-Fi only. "The Samsung Chromebook will cost $429 in the U.S. for the Wi-Fi only version and $499 for the 3G version. Acer's Wi-Fi only Chromebook will cost $349," reports CNet.

Here's one of the Samsung Chromebooks:


While Chromebooks don't require administration, businesses and schools need a way to manage hundreds or thousands of notebooks, so Google decided to offer a service that includes a cloud management console, support, device warranties and regular hardware refreshes for only $20/user (schools) or $28/user (businesses).

Chromebooks are actually the real netbooks, lightweight and inexpensive computers built for simple tasks like browsing the Web. Unfortunately, netbooks are no longer very popular and users replace them with tablets like the iPad, which have better displays, better battery and are easier to use. For now, Chromebooks will compete with Windows netbooks and it won't be easy to convince people to buy a Chrome netbook when they could run Chrome on a regular netbook. The good news is that Chromebooks will force Google to improve its web applications, to offer more advanced features, more free storage and all Google users will benefit even if they don't buy a Chromebook.

39 comments:

  1. I predict that this will suceed with companies that run custom software but it will fail with consumers.

    Not good enough!

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  2. I like Google Chrome but not enough to pay $500 for it when I can get it for free. I'd rather take those $500 and get a Android-powered tablet.

    Maybe if it was cheaper (a lot cheaper) I would give it a chance but right now I'm happy with my desktop and netbook.

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  3. I admit I raised my eyebrows, when I heard the un-subsidized price tags.

    On the other hand, I'm convinced Google believes people who get a chromebook this year will mainly be early adopters (IT personnel, students, and, with 50k of them knocking on the door, businesses). From this angle, I can see why Google is subsidizing schools and businesses, because early adopters (especially students) will evangelize the OS by word of mouth, as many already have.

    I see this beta-like strategy as consistent with past and current Google initiatives: Gmail, Docs, Google Voice, Android, the Cr-48, and, now, Google Music.

    See my comment on the Chrome Source for more:

    http://www.thechromesource.com/report-chrome-os-student-subscriptions-for-20-a-month-to-be-annoucned/#comments

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  4. I have a CR-48 and I like it, but I wouldn't pay more than $200 for it.
    It still needs lots of work, especially in the handling of off-line files.
    I like the concept, but a HUGE part of the concept is AFORDABILITY and this does not meet that.

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  5. I think a lot of people misinterpret google's strategy. i doubt they are trying to make you give up your full featured laptops for it. but once they die and you need a computer i think you'll see the light

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  6. Make them dirt cheap and indispensable and collect the rewards later through advertising. The public want free or very cheap, it's the only way to win.

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  7. They'll have to really come down in price to be competitive... 500 for a 3g machine to allow you to do online only tasks is too much.. 300 for the high end one would be more like it; especially since they don't have to include a windows license

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  8. so, like, they invented the work station? the "thin client"?? :)

    But seriously, it's an interesting concept, maybe just a little bit too expensive for the money. Will be interesting to see how much the retailers discount it.

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  9. "The good news is that Chromebooks will force Google to improve its web applications, to offer more advanced features, more free storage..." Let's hope so. Their apps need some serious injections of new energy.

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  10. If everything can be done in the browser and stored on the web, why do I need to purchase Chromebook? I should be able to access my account from any PC using any browser (at least with Chrome browser).

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  11. BbI BcE roBHo!

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  12. 9I HeHaBu}|{y HerPoB! >: (

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  13. u TyT sisadmins.py OTMETuJIuCb *LoL*

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  14. i hate Obama and Putin! Let's try to do some war or something?

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  15. i think this is bull shit!

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  16. Anonymous said... Haqpura TbI 3aI7aJLuJL sysadmins.ru,cwerj!? >: (

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  17. Come to the Dark Side, young googlevans!

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  18. What's the doode on the video? How his name? I love him and i want childrens from him!

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  19. Come to the Dark Side, we have a cookies...

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  20. I'm wondering how quickly the ChromeOS will somehow become available.. Then buying a cheap device and converting it to a Chromebook might be the way forward!

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  21. Yeaaa, young korean guy... pretty one, i like him too

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  22. дорого, не взлетит.

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  23. Every $0 Billion market has a $0 Billion product portfolio.

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  24. This is pretty exciting. I am glad they added the dual core processor. My Cr48 is great but it would be nice to have a bit of a speed boost. A new track pad will be nice too.

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  25. Frankly speaking, I was considering getting a Tablet for my dad. But now I am waiting for Chromebooks to arrive in India so that I can buy one for him. Seriously... Samsung/Acer launch these in India!

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  26. People are bashing a lot about Chromebooks, they say just get an iPad, especially for older people. But most older people are new to gadgets, much to say, new to tablets (iPad).

    A laptop-like device like this would be very helpful. It has the feel and looks of a laptop and the simplicity of just using it. Not to mention secure.

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  27. I'm sorry, but Google's expecting people to pay approx $400 for a browser?! Seriously!? You can get a netbook for under $200. Heck, you can get an Android tablet for around $200!!! I was hoping these would be sold around $99 (plus a bit more for each option you add on, but I don't expect there would be many).

    I'm guessing Samsung and Acer insisted on those prices to avoid cannibalizing their other products.

    This just doesn't seem like anything to get excited about!

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  28. Cool concept. Wouldn't buy one for myself, but would be great to have at University.

    Nice find

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  29. I ll never buy one (far too limited), but with chromebooks Google will improve his apps (gmail, docs, calendar,...) for all of us :)

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  30. These look great!
    I was wanting to get a new laptop for myself soon, and I came across this. Chromebooks look like the kind of thing where you wouldn't get too distracted on- they look so simple and easy to use. Thanks for making these. Just one question- what time will these arrive in Australia?

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  31. The current price is due to these being the launch models. Once a dozen or so companies start selling them the price will go down a lot.

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  32. http://eyuva.com/2011/05/google-chromebook.html

    Check this out before buying chromebook..

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  33. Wow Impressive! Your blog is very informative. However, it is pretty hard task but your post and experience serve and teach me how to handle and make it more simple and manageable.Thanks for the tips… Best regards.

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  34. Does anyone know if the SIM cards will be changeable? I was thinking of bringing one to Brasil

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  35. I think that if I can't afford a legit laptop this will be what I use for college. I mean you can upload all the files you need to online, and back them up eith USB's right? This is something I'd definately consider buying. I just want to know how durable it is and how long it lasts. I love the fact it's a just a internet browzer. Never seen that before. I might wait for a better version, though. Or when it come out to get more info.

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  36. If you are considering the Chromebook but still want to access Windows apps, then you should consider Ericom AccessNow, Ericom AccessNow, a pure HTML5 RDP client that enables Chromebook users to connect to any RDP host, including Terminal Server (RDS Session Host), physical desktops or VDI virtual desktops – and run their applications and desktops in a browser.

    This means that you can use AccessNow for instant, turnkey web-enablement of most any Windows application. Running entirely within a browser, AccessNow works natively with Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer (with Chrome Frame plug-in), Firefox and any other browser with HTML5 and WebSockets support.

    Ericom‘s AccessNow does not require Java, Flash, Silverlight, ActiveX, or any other underlying technology to be installed on end-user devices.

    For more info, and to download the beta of Ericom AccessNow please visit:
    http://www.ericom.com/html5_rdp_client.asp?URL_ID=708

    For a video demo:
    http://www.ericom.com/AccessNow_Demo.asp?URL_ID=708

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  37. I think it's awesome, I just bought a HTC Flyer (tablet) and I do love it. However, it would be nice to have this with a keyboard. It basically falls in line with a tablet and would compete in that market. Unless you need the full function of a laptop, I don't know why you'd lug one around. This also explains why Google has not released Chrome on the Android market (in my opinion) except for ICS (Ice Cream Sandwich). I think they are trying to push this platform rather than just giving Chrome away for free. Kind of wish I would have waited and got one of these.

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