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October 27, 2015

7 Years of Google Chrome

A lot has changed since Google launched Chrome back in September 2008. Chrome's popularity has been growing ever since then and all the other important browsers became more like Chrome. Google focused on the things that mattered and transformed the browser from a simple application into a "modern OS" for web apps.

While there are many services that claim to measure the market share for browsers, I tend to think that StatCounter is the most accurate. StatCounter's stats for 2008-2015 show that Chrome's market share grew from 0% to 53% in 7 years, while IE's share declined from 67% to 15%. According to StatCounter, Chrome is now the dominant browser, while IE and Firefox are continually losing market share.


It's clear that Google did a lot things right when it launched Chrome, but few people anticipated that Google's browser will take over the world. Most people didn't know what's a browser and only knew that they were supposed to click on the blue E icon to go online. Google changed this by promoting a constantly evolving browser, which was faster and more secure.

6 comments:

  1. I remember a time around 2004, when IE had over 95% marketshare.

    Those were the dark days.

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  2. I've been a FF@linux user for a very long time, but if you compare how much better Chrome/Chromium behaves both when it comes to web standards and performance, it is no surprise that Chrome has gained so much ground.

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    1. It's just to bad that chrome is a little hit and miss when installing on linux. I am a windows child who always wanted to use linux. But certain things always seemed to be harder than they really should have been. Installing Chrome was one of them.

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  3. This chart is missing Windows 10's new Edge browser. Apparently 10 has had huge adoption and Edge is set as the default browser, so was that not an option for this chart, a simple oversight or was the percentage just too low to include?

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    Replies
    1. Too low: http://www.computerworld.com/article/2971957/web-browsers/edge-browser-fails-to-win-over-windows-10-users.html

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