An unofficial blog that watches Google's attempts to move your operating system online since 2005. Not affiliated with Google.

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January 22, 2009

Downloading Files from an Archive

One of the most interesting features available in Free Download Manager, an open source software for Windows, is that you can preview ZIP archives and select the files you want to download. This can be useful if you only need a README file from a big archive or if some of the files are unnecessary.


  1. Yea, excellent software, I'm using it almost 2 years now, and it's much better then other similar software.

  2. It almost looks like a coincidence. :P

    I dont know if I may place a link to it, if not, remove :)

    But lifehacker had a tool like this 6 days ago, before that I never saw or thought about anything like that :)

  3. How does this software correlates with "Google's latest attempts to move your operating system online"? 0_o

  4. @archimed7592:
    That's an ongoing process and many of the posts from this blog aren't explicitly related to Google's online services. "Google OS" is just a metaphor for a platform that moves most of your data and applications online, while making your real OS irrelevant.

    The platform is far from being finished, so no Google service handles archives well. You can't preview a ZIP attachment in Gmail or selectively download some of the files. FDM (Free Download Manager) adds this very useful feature, along with many others: integration with IE and Firefox, downloading from several mirrors, download acceleration, previewing videos and audio files etc.

  5. That's cool and all, but while I use Google and love this blog, I don't use Windows. Less "other", more Google (or, well, the same as you've been doing).

  6. It strikes me that this kind of service could work great online (caching the zip file indexes for many users, and hoarding zip file popularity data). For protected links (cookie/ip/...) things would get more complicated, and a locally installed software like the one mentioned is needed. Ultimately file-handling should integrate better with the browser, I'm sure.